Monday, April 21, 2008

The Visitor

Last night, around 12:15, I was in bed reading about to go to sleep and Jeremy was in the office working when we heard a pounding on the front door. I got up and grabbed my phone and tennis racket while we were deciding whether or not to open the door. There have been a few incidents in Knoxville lately where someone knocks on the door in the middle of the night and then injures/kills/robs the people at the home. While we were deliberating the person knocked again, this time quietly. Jeremy turned on the porch light and looked through the blinds and finally opened the door a crack. I stood behind him wielding my racket and had my phone open, ready to call 911. The guy, who looked to be about 40 and fairly clean cut, started telling us this bogus story that jumped from one place to another. The gist of it was that he and his wife were our neighbors, locked out of their house, and his wife was at the gas station down the street. Okay, we thought, he needs to borrow the phone to call pop-a-lock. But then he kept going on and on and adding in all these crazy details that didn't pertain to the story, and finally he said his wife needed to pay for the gas she pumped and can he have $17? He'll pay us back tonight or in the morning if we prefer. Umm, no he could not. Several things seemed wrong about this story:

1. He had his car, meaning, he had his keys and probably wasn't locked out of the house.
2. His wife had her car, also meaning she had her keys.
3. We didn't recognize him. Granted we don't really know our neighbors, but we know the ones around us by sight at least.
4. The gas station at the end of the road is pre-pay only. I know this for a fact because we filled up Jeremy's bike on Friday and I was making fun of the sign on the pump because it said "Please 'pre-pay' for gas." I thought it was funny that pre-pay was in quotations. His wife couldn't have pumped her gas without paying for it first.
5. Do they not have debit/credit cards that they can use to pay for the gas?
6. Surely he could have asked one of the relatives he mentioned in the story for the money.
7. It was after midnight. Nothing good happens after midnight.


Jeremy yelled at the guy for coming to the door after midnight to ask for $17 and told him to go away. He didn't even try to defend his story, he just left. We watched to make sure he didn't go to our neighbors before calling the police non-emergency number to alert them.

Seriously, did he really think we were stupid enough to give him money? Besides, this is a cashless society, we don't carry money.